Holy Anole!  LbNA # 23366

OwnerWill'sWorld      
Placed DateJul 1 2006
CountySan Jacinto
LocationColdspring, TX
Boxes1
Found ByOpen Space
Last UpdateNov 19 2011

Clues

Often mistaken for chameleons, the green anole is a tree-dwelling lizard that is native to the southeastern United States and Caribbean islands. Green anoles are also found in warm climates throughout North and South America.

Often seen in parks and residential areas on walls, fences, trees, and low bushes, green anoles reach a maximum length of six to eight inches. Their bodies are slender, with a long, thin tail. Like true chameleons, green anoles have the ability to change color; this ability is limited in anoles, however--coloration is usually green, yellow, brown, gray, or a mixture. Most healthy, non-threatened anoles are bright green in appearance. The male anole has a large pink fan of skin on its neck, called a dewlap, which can be extended for courtship or territorial display.

Active and agile creatures, anoles have specially adapted pads on their feet which permit them to climb, cling, and run on virtually any surface. Another adaptation of the anole is its extremely fragile tail which drops off its body when grabbed, allowing the anole to escape from predators; in time, the anole will regrow a new (although generally shorter) tail. Anoles feed on small insects such as crickets, cockroaches, spiders, moths, and grubs. (Source: Wild Texas)

Directions: The letterbox is located on the Lone Star Hiking Trail. From Cleveland, Texas take FM 2025 north 14 miles (from the intersection of FM 2025 and US 59) until you see a small parking area on your right (it is located at a left handed bend in the road). From Coldspring, Texas go south on FM 2025 to the Double Lake Recreational Area. Continue 1.2 miles to the bend in the road mentioned above.

Clues: After you have parked hike along the Lone Star trail to the right. Keep going until you reach a sharp left turn marked by a post with 2 left pointing trail markers (white metal strips). From the turn continue along the trail for 180 steps (90 paces). On the right side of the trail will be a large Loblolly Pine with a stump directly behind it. The stump is from an tree that was cut down and shows signs of being burnt. Holy Anole! is located between the two trees under pine needles and debris. Please recover the box well. (Approximately a 1 1/2 mile round trip.)