William F. Cody  LbNA # 24581

OwnerEsmerelda      
Placed DateAug 12 2006
CountyPark
LocationCody / Pahaska, WY
Boxes1
Found ByThe Dragon
Last UpdateJul 1 2013

Clues

I have a great affection for Buffalo Bill. We share the same birthday! While staying in Cody to visit the fantastic Buffalo Bill Historical Center, we planted this box in his honor.

THIS BOX IS RIGHT NEXT TO A WELL TRAVELED HIGHWAY AND NEAR FOOT TRAILS AND PEOPLE.. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE TIME TO BE STEALTHY AND REMAIN UNSEEN WHILE FINDING IT AND PROPERLY AND COMPLETELY REHIDING IT, *PLEASE* LEAVE IT OFF YOUR LIST UNTIL ANOTHER TIME RATHER THAN RISK BEING SEEN! THANKS!

One of the most colorful figures of the Old West became the best known spokesman for the New West. He was born William Frederick Cody in Iowa on February 26, 1846. At 22, in Kansas, he was rechristened "Buffalo Bill". He had been a trapper, a bullwhacker, a Colorado "Fifty-Niner", Pony Express rider (1860), wagonmaster, stagecoach driver, Civil War soldier, and even hotel manager. He earned his nickname for his skill while supplying Kansas Pacific Railroad workers with buffalo meat.

From 1868 through 1872 he was continously employed by the United States Army, a record in the hazardous and uncertain scouting profession. He won the congressional Medal of Honor in 1872 and was ever after the favorite scout of the Fifth Cavalry. The men of the Fifth considered Buffalo Bill to be "good luck." He kept them from ambush, he guided them to victory, and his own fame reflected glory on the regiment. Cody considered himself lucky too. He was lucky to have been wounded in action just once, and then it was "only a scalp wound." But mostly he felt lucky to have been in the right place at the right time.

In 1872 he appeared on stage for the first time, playing himself in "Scouts of the Prairie." Thereafter he continued to act in the winter and scout for the Fifth in the summer. The Wild West show was inaugurated in Omaha in 1883 with real cowboys and real Indians portraying the "real West." The show spent ten of its thirty years in Europe. In 1887 Buffalo Bill was a feature attraction at Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. At the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893, only Egypt's gyrations rivalled the Wild West as the talk of Chicago. By the turn of the century, Buffalo Bill was probably the most famous and most recognizable man in the world.

The phenomenal success of the Wild West was founded on a nostalgia for the passing frontier which swept the nation in the late 19th Century. But Buffalo Bill himself never looked backward. "All my interests are still with the west - the modern west," he wrote near the end of his life.

He used his fame and public attention as a soapbox for western causes, for the rights of Indians and women, and for conservation. As early as 1879 he cautioned the government to "never make a single promise to the Indians that is not fulfilled." All frontier scouts respected the Indian, he said. "Every Indian outbreak that I have ever known has resulted from broken promises and broken treaties by the government." America was the Indian's heritage, and the Indian had only fought for what was his.

Cody recognized very early that a developer in the West was obligated to be a preserver as well. He has spoken out against the hide-hunters of the 1870s and 1880s for slaughtering the buffalo "cruelly, recklessly." In Wyoming and Colorado he worked to establish game preserves and limit hunting seasons. Gifford Pinchot, noted conservationist and head of the Forest Service for Theodore Roosevelt, lauded him as "not only a fighter but a seer."

He helped his West to make the transition from a wild past to a progressive future. His was the New West, he wrote, "with its cities, drawing upon the mountains for the water to make it fertile, and upon the whole world for men to make it rich."

Buffalo Bill Cody advertised through his Wild West Show enticing settlers to come west and take up land under the Cody Canal. There was a sense of excitement and urgency felt by the people moving west. They realized that the Western lands were nearly all settled and if they wanted to be a part of this epic drama they must relocate soon.

Cody, along with a group of investors from Buffalo, New York, and George T. Beck and Holger Alger of Sheridan, Wyoming, formed the Shoshone Land and Irrigation Company and proceeded with plans to locate a town. Cody was established at the present site in 1896.

Colonel William Frederick Cody built Pahaska Tepee in 1901, and gave to it his Sioux Indian name, which means "Long-Haired Man." Until his death in 1917, he used it as a hunting lodge and a place to entertain his many friends. Pahaska has know celebrity, royalty and unknown alike. Perhaps the largest and best remembered party was that given for Albert I, Prince of Monaco, in 1913, when the Prince and his retinue and many local friends of Colonel Cody, hunted and played for sixty days. So profuse was Buffalo Bill's hospitality that Pahaska Tepee became almost as well know in Wyoming as the owner himself.

From Cody, head towards the East entrance of Yellowstone National park. You will find Cody's Pahaska Tepee about two miles before the park.
On the east side of the lodge there is a bridge on the highway. Park on the NE side of the bridge (the Cody side).

Stand on the SOUTH side of the bridge facing the lodge.

Turn LEFT and walk down the hill a short distance to two large boulders that touch in the middle.

Pass the larger, uphill boulder and walk around to the west side (river side) of the smaller boulder.

Carefully push the grasses aside, remove the rocks and reach way back into William F. Cody's hidee hole to find the handmade journal and handcarved stamp.

Please make sure that it is pushed all the way back in and covered with rocks and grasses when you leave to hide it from the eyes of fishermen and hikers!