Spring Has Sprung  LbNA # 4372 (ARCHIVED)

OwnerAdoptable    
Placed DateJun 16 2003
CountyHartford
LocationSimsbury, CT
Boxes1
Planted ByMDMT    
Found By SweetPea.
Last Found Jul 28 2004
StatusFFFFFFFFFFaaaam  
Hike Distance?

Sorry guys, I heard that this one was missing. I live far far away now, so I can't replant it. If anyone wants to, please feel free.

Difficulty – supa dupa easy
Time – 7 minutes 29 seconds
Fun factor – eh
Cool tree factor – not too shabby

The day we planted this box, it felt like it was the first ray of sunshine that I’ve seen in a year. For that reason, we called it “Spring Has Sprung.” Finally!

With regards to the location, my ex-girlfriend originally showed me this tree and told me that it was the oldest tree in CT. I’m not so sure about her credentials, but it wouldn’t surprise me if it was true. This is a very very very big, old sycamore tree located in Simsbury, CT that kind of hangs over the road right before you hit a bridge. You should be able to figure out this pseudomystery letterbox if you can figure out where to find the tree. (Honestly, I just don’t even know the names of the streets specifically. But if you really just don’t know and still want to do this letterbox, let me know and we’ll work something out.)

Ok, so my current girlfriend and I (I know, I’m such a stud. “Riiiight” (said with a Dr. Evil voice)) were letterboxing at Talcott Mountain (oooh another clue for the location) and we were hot and tired and just wanted to go home, I convinced her to take a quick detour to show her my favorite 23 foot circumferenced sycamore tree. Then I planted a letter box there.

So as you pull in the parking lot, with your back to the road you came from, head to the tree on your right to the picnic bench. Walk from that picnic bench to where the grass ends and the overgrown weeds begin. Now looking kind of in the Northeast about, oh, guessing, 30 feet into the woods, you’ll see a tree that has many trees sprouting from the same trunk, but also many other trees that have fallen into it. Well, find a way to get there and look on it’s NE side for your letterbox. I found it easiest to walk through a little “path” a little bit (~10 feet) to the left and walk back towards the water and then turn right. Or if you’re not afraid of ticks, then head straight on baby!

Sorry these directions stink. It was very hot that day and we had no water and were very tired, so I didn’t write everything down verbatim. But it’s such a tiny place that you really can’t have a difficult time finding it. Just please check out the big trees and hug them for me, please. Thanks, letterboxers.

Any questions, comments, complaints, life lessons, jokes, or haikus about the condition of the letterbox, please email me at letterbiznox@yahoo.com

Keep on rockin’ in the free world!