Feeding the Geese - RETIRED  LbNA # 5415 (ARCHIVED)

OwnerAdoptable    
Placed DateAug 27 2003
CountyNew London
LocationColchester, CT
Boxes1
Found By butterfly
Last Found Jul 5 2007
StatusFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF  
Hike Distance?

BOX RETIRED!!!
I was able to get out and retrieve what was left of this box. The hand carved stamp and ink pads were missing and unfortunately the box was poorly rehidden. As a result I am retiring this box. Perhaps there will be a Feeding the Geese II at some point! Thanks to all who took the time to find our box!

Mama Bear, Little Bear & Jes



Difficulty: Easy, a great trip for those little letterboxers!

Feeding the Geese Letterbox is located at the Ruby & Elizabeth Cohen Woodlands located on McDonald Rd in Colchester, CT. McDonald Rd is located off Rte 354. The park contains 121 acres of open space including a pond, marshland, trails and picnic areas. A nature center is planned for the future.

We have enjoyed feeding the geese here for several years. And trust us, they are always hungry, so be sure to bring them a tasty treat. The fish seem to always be hungry too, so if you are inclined, a fishing pole and picnic will make for a nice afternoon. Please note there is no swimming at the Woodlands. There is however, a large wildflower field that attracts numerous butterflies, dragon flies, grasshoppers, and other assorted insects if that is an interest of yours.

Park in the parking area on the right. Follow the long line of trees along the pond at the end you will notice a large wooden sign off to the right. This sign marks the start of the trail. Get on the trail and go a short distance until you come to pair of tree stumps a mist what might be the remains of an old stonewall on your left. With the stumps at your back, bushwhack 13 paces “diagonally” back toward the pond. (You will know you are right if you pass through a triangle of tree stumps at about 10 paces.) The treasure you are seeking can be found in the roots of the twin trunk maple tree. Off to the right is a grouping of dead and decaying trees, home to all sorts of forest critters.