Tombstone  LbNA # 65780

OwnerGiant Eyeball!    
Placed DateSep 12 2013
CountyTravis
Location2107 Goodrich Ave, Austin, TX
Boxes1
Found ByPI Joe
Last UpdateNov 1 2013

Clues

lyrical inspiration:
Look at all the plans I made
Falling down like scraps of paper
I will leave them
Where they lie to remind me

From the past a rumor comes
Don't let it keep dragging you down
Throw the memory in an open fire
And you'll be free

Roll back the tombstone
Let the saints appear
Roll back the tombstone
Then make a new man out of me

Beware of the passenger
The train already left the station
We are neither at home nor at work
We are moving

Listen to the howling of steel
A face betraying no emotion
Like you never had a chance to be
Wild and free

Roll back the tombstone
Let the saints appear
Roll back the tombstone
'Til the Lone Ranger rides again
Rides again in your mind

Ride across the open plain
All the way and back again, back again

Listen to the howling of steel
A face betraying no emotion
You never had a chance to be
Wild and free

Roll back the tombstone
Let the saints appear
Roll back the tombstone
'Til the Lone Ranger rides again
Rides again in your mind

Roll back the tombstone
Let the saints appear
Roll back the tombstone
Then make a new man out of me, out of me

Roll back the tombstone



find the box:
Go to 2107 Goodrich Ave in South Central Austin. Stand facing a boarded-up, small white cinderblock building which is what remains of The Barton Springs Baptist Church. Walk down the right side of the lot with the church on your left and a wooden fence that separates you from an apartment complex on your right. Go to the end of the fence and then walk another 16 steps. Look left to 2 multi-trunked ligustrums. The box is held by the smaller tree on the left, the one directly behind the church. Please make sure you put enough rocks and leaves back to completely hide the box. If you look behind the apartment complex, towards the back right corner of the lot, you will see the broken tombstones of a small abandoned graveyard. This is one of the first African-American cemeteries in Central Texas, with burials dating from 1866.