Badger Bob  LbNA # 72159

OwnerSilver Eagle      
Placed DateAug 18 2017
CountyEl Paso
LocationEvergreen Cemetery, Colorado Springs, CO
Boxes1
Found By
Last Found
Hike Distance.1 mi
Last EditedSep 4 2017

Terrain Difficulty: Easy (flat, 20 yards RT)
Status: alive



Robert "Badger Bob" Johnson was born on March 4, 1931, in the hockey haven of Minneapolis, Minnesota. He played a lot of hockey and eventually moved to the place where his nickname originated, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he served as head hockey coach from 1966 to 1981. During his time with the Badgers, Johnson led the team to seven NCAA tournaments, winning three national championships in 1973, 1977, and 1981. In 1982, Johnson began his National Hockey League coaching career with the Calgary Flames and was there for five years, leading them to the Stanley Cup Finals in 1986. Before the 1990-91 season, Badger Bob was offered a position as head coach of the Pittsburgh Penguins, a team on the rise led by superstar captain Mario Lemieux. He led the Penguins to their first Stanley Cup in team history during that season, and became an overnight icon in the city of Pittsburgh. Johnson is endearingly remembered by Penguins' players and fans for his enthusiasm, his love for the game of hockey, his passion for coaching, and his rare optimism regardless of the situation at hand. His famous catchphrase: "It's a great day for hockey" became synonymous with the game of hockey and is forever etched in the hearts and minds of all Penguins' fans. In August of 1991, tragedy struck for the Badger when he suffered a brain aneurysm and he died on November 26, 1991 in Colorado Springs. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, where this box can be found.

Directions:
Drive to Evergreen Cemetery at 1005 Hancock Expressway. Bear right on main road and go to block 101 near end, turn right and go to end by block 118, then turn left and go short way to medium and small pine trees on right and park.

Clues:
Walk to medium pine tree and find LB at back base under sticks and needles, then walk across road to see grave of Robert Johnson.